Are you a Windows Pirate? Keep Calm! Microsoft will still offer you a free Windows 10 upgrade

Windows 10 technical preview

Let me start by saying I do not know how many individuals in Africa have a genuine copy of Windows software. The amount of pirated software in Africa is literally humongous. I cannot with accuracy support why this is so but some debate that it’s the prohibitive costs while some say the lack of payment systems that make it hard to purchase software. I wish I could find statistics about how many of the unlicensed versions are in Africa alone. (If you get them, please let me know).

Initially Microsoft was offering the Windows 10 Upgrade for one year to those running Windows 7, 8 and 8.1. Microsoft is very well aware of how many pirates are running unlicensed versions of Windows software around the world but will still offer them a Windows 10 upgrade anyway.  A Microsoft spokesman is quoted saying;

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“We believe customers over time will realize the value of properly licensing Windows, and we will make it easy for them to move to legitimate copies.”

According to VentureBeat, Anyone with a qualified device can upgrade to Windows 10, including those with pirated copies of Windows. The implications of this are way bigger than you think. It means that anyone can pirate Windows 7 or 8 and also qualify to upgrade to Windows 10. if this is done, Windows 10 may become the fasted adopted software on the planet.

On whether this approach to fighting piracy will work or not, I can guarantee that the decision will make lot’s of people happy.

Microsoft has really been working hard on their latest operating system Windows 10 which has created a lot of anticipation with many people predicting that this may erase the harm done by Windows 8.0 and finally address all the issues that many Windows users have been complaining about. Microsoft announced that they will be releasing Windows 10 this summer which is between June to August. The release will be in 190 countries and in 111 languages.