Safeboda now does free delivery of Shell Gas to Kampala suburbs


Only somebody who uses liquid petroleum gas (LPG) knows the hustle of replacing the used canisters with a new one. First and foremost, the canister even when empty is still quite heavy. For those without private means of transport, it means carrying it to the roadside and then hailing a taxi, or boda boda. And that’s not even the end of it. Oftentimes, the gas won’t be at the Fuel station you go to which means paying your boda guy extra to take you someplace else.

That’s where Safeboda comes in. The startup has entered a partnership with Shell to deliver gas right to your doorstep. You can place an order for 6kgs or 15kgs and a Safeboda rider will bring it to you. What’s more, it’s totally free! Matter of fact, you can call Safeboda on a toll-free line [0800300200] to place the order or inquire about the service.

Advertisement - Continue reading below

The gas delivery service is quite new and as such, Safeboda is starting up with only a few select towns. These include Naguru, Ntinda, Bukoto, Nakawa and Lugogo. Fingers crossed; perhaps Safeboda will scale their service areas in the near future. And maybe deliver gas from other petroleum companies.

Dubbed the Uber of Boda bodas, SafeBoda has taken great strides to return some form of sanity to the boda boda industry in and around Kampala. Boda riders enlisted by the startup are easy to spot. You just have to look out for a boda rider in possession of two numbered orange helmets; one his, while the other is reserved for any client he picks up. According to Safeboda’s Facebook page, they even provide hygienic head caps before you wear their helmets.  Safeboda riders are trained on matters of road safety and wear an orange reflector vest with the rider’s name at the back. Considering you don’t normally know who exactly is transporting you, this is a necessary precaution.


  • Jake

    Is that really, “safe”? I think it is also illegal. It is one of those laws/bans government put in place and never lifted. It was banned during the kabaka riots because people were burning car tires and firewood in the middle of roads.